A drop of sunshine

“Over the next twenty years the earth is predicted to add another two billion people. Having nearly exhausted nature’s ability to feed the planet, we now need to discover a new food system. The global climate will continue to change. To save our coastlines, and maintain acceptable living conditions for more than a billion people, we need to discover new science, engineering, design, and architectural methods, and pioneer economic models that sustain their implementation and maintenance. Microbiological threats will increase as our traditional techniques of anti-microbial defense lead to greater and greater resistances, and to thwart these we must discover new approaches to medical treatment, which we can afford, and implement in ways that incite compliance and good health. The many rich and varied human cultures of the earth will continue to mix, more rapidly than they ever have, through mass population movements and unprecedented information exchange, and to preserve social harmony we need to discover new cultural referents, practices, and environments of cultural exchange. In such conditions the futures of law, medicine, philosophy, engineering, and agriculture – with just about every other field – are to be rediscovered. Americans need to learn how to discover.”

American Schools Are Training Kids for a World That Doesn’t Exist | WIRED (via infoneer-pulse)

While I’m based in Australia this is quite relevant here too; I know so many chemical engineering grads in my year who couldn’t find work relevant to their field - there simply hasn’t been enough growth in the new development of technologies to employ them - too little business confidence in new ideas or methods so other than improving their scientific literacy, for most of them who did it to get a job their education has been wasted (post-grad studies aren’t an option for many who already have a $20,000 HECS debt hanging over their heads). I consider myself very lucky to have found a relevant position in this financial climate – but I was in the same boat for 8 months after graduating.

We need to find ways of encouraging and developing more efficient and smarter technologies for things like energy consumption, recycling and reducing the impact of waste and find ways to get them to the public. While us grads have the knowledge for how to flesh out an idea technically, we have no knowledge of how to get funds for it, who to ask for advice and how to develop a business plan – it’s just not part of the curriculum.

No one seems to be stepping up to the table – since they changed the program to require 12 weeks relevant engineering work experience perhaps only a quarter of the penultimate year students has been able to find a vacation work position – unless they come up with a solution like paying an engineering firm to come up with a real or imaginary project for them to work on that means ¾ can’t even graduate next year. The lecturers keep saying the will, but have still haven’t done anything to contact companies about it. I managed to get one company on board to offer vacation positions to 2-3 students in exchange for control of their final year research projects, so if they tried I’m sure they could make a difference. Their apathy is aggravating.

(via thecraftychemist)

(via shychemist)

civem:

v0ldewhoret:

sometimes I feel like a seal is just a neutral sea lion

neutral

as in 

without an ion

everyone needs to see this post i’m not sorry

(via eatgeekstudy)

twisteddoodles:

'if at first you don't succeed…' The science version!

twisteddoodles:

'if at first you don't succeed…' The science version!

(via eatgeekstudy)

trebaolofarabia:

amanderegg:

rawtranquility:

A flower for you, my lady.

Sloths are what happens when coconuts come alive

That…that is the best descriptions of sloths ever.

trebaolofarabia:

amanderegg:

rawtranquility:

A flower for you, my lady.

Sloths are what happens when coconuts come alive

That…that is the best descriptions of sloths ever.

(Source: televandalist, via this--too--shall--pass)